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Tag: Falls Reduction

What You Can Do to Prevent Slips, Trips & Falls

With a third of people age 65 and better reporting a fall each year and two-thirds of that number falling again within six months, falling poses a significant risk to older adults in their daily lives. In fact, falling is the most common cause of injury-related deaths in those age 65 and better, and leads to the majority of their lifetime injury costs. Falling can cause traumatic...

Fall Outcomes Highlight Importance of Pre-Fall Functional Well-being

Falls are known to be a leading cause of functional decline among older adults, though little is known about the relationship between pre-fall functional ability and post-fall trajectory. In other words, it is unclear how pre-fall functional status might be clinically useful information in post-fall treatment and recovery. A longitudinal study presented in JAMA Internal Medicine found...

Low-Cost, Video-Based Exercise Interventions May Be Effective for Improving Strength & Flexibility

Functional physical limitations are a significant risk factor for older adults, as they can lead to isolation, frailty, and increased risk for falls. Exercise training, particularly exercise that focuses on strength and flexibility, has been shown to be an effective means for improving physical function and reducing the risk of functional limitations and physical disability. However,...

Fear of Falling: Safety Concerns & Physical Activity

While hospitalization is often necessary, it can carry risks for older adults—around 30 percent of hospitalizations among older adults lead to a loss of ability to complete one of the activities of daily living (ADL, such as bathing or toileting independently). It appears that physical inactivity, which leads to atrophy and decline in muscle strength, may be one major cause of these...

Promoting Strength & Balance with Salsa Dancing

Falls are the main cause of injury among adults age 65 and better. Loss of postural control (the ability to maintain balance) and loss of strength are significant risk factors for falling. Resistance training is an effective way to increase strength, however, its benefits seem restricted to developing power and peak force rather than improving balance. There are clinically effective...

Falls Risk Assessments and a Possible Link to Cognitive Health

There are a few tests which are used to assess mobility and falls risk in older adults, such as the “Timed Up and Go” test (TUG), the Berg Balance Test (BBT), and the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI). An article in Gerontology compares these three assessments, and suggests that the TUG may be more useful in the assessment of physically healthier individuals and is also related to cognitive...

Personal Identity and Participation in Falls Reduction

Research on falls reduction has identified several effective approaches to reducing falls risk. Current evidence-based programs exist and can be used to reduce the risk of falls among older adult falls reduction program participants. Still uncertain, however, is how to recruit and retain older adult participants to falls reduction programs. A recent qualitative study suggests that...

Falls Reduction Programs: Why Older Adults Do or Don’t Participate

Falls reduction programming can be effective in reducing falls thus enhancing the well-being and independence of many older adults. Even so, agencies and health care providers have difficulty encouraging older adults to take part in falls reduction programs. A recent article in the Journal of Aging Research explores the barriers to and motivations behind participating in falls...

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