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Category: Long-term Care

What You Can Do to Prevent Slips, Trips & Falls

With a third of people age 65 and better reporting a fall each year and two-thirds of that number falling again within six months, falling poses a significant risk to older adults in their daily lives. In fact, falling is the most common cause of injury-related deaths in those age 65 and better, and leads to the majority of their lifetime injury costs. Falling can cause traumatic...

Influences on Caregivers’ Self-Perceived Ability to Provide Individualized Care

Individualized care (also referred to as person-centered care, consumer-directed care, and self-directed care) takes into account resident individuality, includes resident participation in decision-making processes, and provides a holistic approach to wellness. However, providing individualized care can be a resource- and energy-intensive process for long-term care staff. Such...

Fall Outcomes Highlight Importance of Pre-Fall Functional Well-being

Falls are known to be a leading cause of functional decline among older adults, though little is known about the relationship between pre-fall functional ability and post-fall trajectory. In other words, it is unclear how pre-fall functional status might be clinically useful information in post-fall treatment and recovery. A longitudinal study presented in JAMA Internal Medicine found...

The Long-Term Care Needs of Same-Sex Couples

With the increased visibility of the older adult gay, lesbian, and bisexual (LGB) population, new research is identifying health disparities that affect the well-being of LGB older adults. One emerging line of research in this area is on the long-term care (LTC) needs of the LGB population. LGB older adults experience higher rates of chronic stress due to stigma and discrimination,...

Low-Cost, Video-Based Exercise Interventions May Be Effective for Improving Strength & Flexibility

Functional physical limitations are a significant risk factor for older adults, as they can lead to isolation, frailty, and increased risk for falls. Exercise training, particularly exercise that focuses on strength and flexibility, has been shown to be an effective means for improving physical function and reducing the risk of functional limitations and physical disability. However,...

Fear of Falling: Safety Concerns & Physical Activity

While hospitalization is often necessary, it can carry risks for older adults—around 30 percent of hospitalizations among older adults lead to a loss of ability to complete one of the activities of daily living (ADL, such as bathing or toileting independently). It appears that physical inactivity, which leads to atrophy and decline in muscle strength, may be one major cause of these...

The Long-Term Care Insurance Paradox

The aging of the so-called baby boomer generation (Americans born between 1946 and 1965) was expected by some to be a boon to sellers of long-term care insurance. Given the increase in life expectancy in the United States, and the disproportionate concentration of income within this age cohort, many predicted that a spike in long-term care insurance sales would occur before and around...

Coordination of Roles & Policies Contributes to Job Satisfaction Among LTC Employees

Research on the organizational factors that contribute (positively or negatively) to job satisfaction has suggested that the influence of any given factor may vary significantly across professions. A recent study published in the journal Administration in Social Work examined the relationship between job satisfaction in long-term care (LTC) and four organizational factors that have...

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